How to develop a musical ear

If you think that hearing is given to a person from birth, then you are deeply mistaken. Hearing is something that you can develop if you want to, because the abilities in each one are inherent in nature itself. There are several types of human hearing: internal (when we can play music in our imagination), melodic (when we understand the structure of music), rhythmic (when we feel its rhythm), relative (when we perceive the intervals and tones of music) and intonational (the nature of music).

  1. In order to develop our hearing, we can learn to play a musical instrument. In this way, you will learn to play notes, remember how they sound and practice your sense of rhythm.

You will develop your hearing and learn to sing. If you don’t have a piano, you can download the program to your phone or tablet and practice every day singing scales. Once you have mastered this, you can move on to chords and the simplest melodies. The main thing is to overcome your own embarrassment.

  1. Meditate! Oddly enough, this is another way to develop musical hearing. Meditation is designed to concentrate attention, and the sounds you need to pronounce during it, for example, ommm – in fact, very melodic and musical. Learn to concentrate on the sounds of nature and the world around you when you go for a walk or on your way to work. You’ll be surprised at how many different sounds surround us every day!
  2. Listen to the voices. Not in your head! But listen to the voices of people you know and don’t know, actors in cinema, announcers and presenters of TV programs, catch the timbre of a person, his manner of speaking, play his voice in your imagination.
  3. Learn to listen to music. Turn on your favorite song and try to determine which musical instrument is currently playing, the real drums or electronic, etc. Arrange the music into shelves, and this will allow you to learn to really understand the music.
  4. Develop a sense of rhythm. You can buy a metronome for this purpose or download a special application to your phone. Follow the program’s prompts to beat the rhythm with your fingers, toes, and anything you like. Once you learn how to use the program, you can move on to more complicated things – real melodies to try and repeat them yourself. At first, focus on those musical pieces where there is a part on the drums, it will make your task much easier.
  5. There is another simple yet effective method to work on your hearing. Sit on a chair in the middle of the room, close your eyes and ask someone close to you to walk around making sounds (for example, clapping your hands, singing something, whistling, etc.). It is your job to determine exactly where the sound is coming from without opening your eyes.
This is the best orchestra ever! Debica, Poland

All children are born with the prerequisites of musical hearing, and the opportunities to develop it in solfeggio lessons can be endless. The solfeggio lesson occupies an important place in the set of subjects taught at the music school. This lesson uses many different forms of work to develop the musical abilities of children.

How to develop musical auditory hearing?

At first, the baby learns to navigate through the sounds of everyday life: the sound of water, the cat meowing, the flick of the switch.

The temporal crust of the right hemisphere is responsible for this function. Over time, her baby will not only react to sounds, but will also try to repeat them. Read more about Learning Styles Series: The Auditory Learner

By around eight months, the baby only uses sounds that are present in his native speech.Read more here https://argoprep.com/blog/learning-styles-series-the-auditory-learner/

At normal rates of development in a year or two “little man” is able to perform a simple task (“bring a doll”) or understand the elementary question (“where is the mother?”).

The development of phonemic hearing requires, first of all, regular exercise and training. You can do them both under the control of a speech therapist and at home with your mother. We will look at specific examples for each age.

For children aged 3-4 years.

Choose two pictures – with a bear and a mouse. Discuss the first one: the bear lives in the forest and sleeps in the den. Then think about the mouse: what does it love and where can you meet it? We explain that the sound of words is similar, but their meaning is absolutely different.
Say them together with the child, let you feel the difference. You can also play with other word pairs: candle heater, tire-machine.
Show different pictures of objects and ask to clearly say what is depicted on them. If you break the words into pieces, it will only be a plus: pal-ka, shishka.
The child guesses with the voice of the hero you were talking about. In a more complex variant, the child “tries on” various sound intonations himself: tries to speak with the voice of a hare, fox or robot.

In children 5-6 years old.
Only those sounds that have been properly pronounced are perceived correctly.
This affects the development of the dictionary and the acquisition of literacy. It is only possible to understand the relationship between letters and sounds when pronouncing them clearly.

Choose two pictures – with a bear and a mouse. Discuss the first one: the bear lives in the forest and sleeps in the den. Then think about the mouse: what does it love and where can you meet it? We explain that the sound of words is similar, but their meaning is absolutely different.
Say them together with the child, let you feel the difference. You can also play with other word pairs: candle heater, tire-machine.
Show different pictures of objects and ask to clearly say what is depicted on them. If you break the words into pieces, it will only be a plus: pal-ka, shishka.
The child guesses with the voice of the hero you were talking about. In a more complex variant, the child “tries on” various sound intonations himself: tries to speak with the voice of a hare, fox or robot.

In children 6-7 years old.
Many parents are sure that their child only has to learn letters, and he will immediately start reading and writing. But that’s a big misunderstanding. Memorizing letters does not guarantee that there will be no serious difficulties in learning to write. And most mistakes come from phonemic hearing problems.

An adult makes a sound and names the word in which it is present. The child must catch this sound: clap his hands when he hears it. First, we select the words so that the sound is at the beginning. Gradually, the task becomes more complicated: we move it to the middle or end. After a while you can read the whole text and “catch” the sound in the same way.
The adult calls the word and throws the ball to the child. Krokha should rhyme and throw the ball back. We start with the simplest words. If the baby is difficult, we tell him the right answer.
We suggest listening to a chain of words, and then repeat them. We gradually add new words. At first, you can play with pictures, but then the emphasis is on the auditory memory. The goal is to memorize as many words as possible in a row. An error has occurred – the game starts again.